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Rio de Janeiro

Rio uses QR codes to help tourists

The pavements of Rio de Janeiro are receiving a facelift, as officials install QR code mosaics on the streets of the city. The new QR codes are being installed in order to help tourists navigate their way around Rio with ease.

The first of 30 QR codes went up on Friday at Arpoador, a boulder that rises at the end of Ipanema beach. Tourists were encouraged to scan the code and download the app which intends to make exploring the city much easier. Users of the app will also be given information about the area they are in, and the app will be available in Portuguese, Spanish and English.

Information the app will provide includes, surf conditions, facts about the local beaches, the history of the area and maps of Rio de Janeiro.

The app will have the potential to be used by Rio’s two million foreign visitors that come to the city each year. "If you add the number of Brazilian tourists, this tool has a great potential to be useful," said Marcos Correa Bento, head of the city's conservation and public works.

"We use so much technology to pass information, this makes sense," said Raul Oliveira Neto, one of the first to use the QR code at Arpoador. "It's the way we do things nowadays.”

Diego Fortunato, who was also one of the first at the scene, said “there's a little map; it even shows you where we are... Rio doesn't always have information for those who don't know the city; it's something the city needs, that it's been lacking."

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